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Lake Titicaca is famous around the world as being the world's highest navigable lake, at over 3,800m above sea level. There are many other lakes in the world higher than this, including several in Peru, although Lake Titicaca is probably the highest with regular boat services. The lake itself is immense, with an area of over 8,000 square kilometres, and if it were not for the fact that it is almost four kilometres high, it could almost be mistaken for the ocean.

The Lake has become one of Peru 's main tourist destinations, and taking a boat ride on this incredible body of water offers splendid views of the snow-capped Cordillera Real rising over the deep blue waters. The islands on the lake, as well as being very beautiful, provide a wonderful insight into the traditional life of the inhabitants, with many of these living in a similar fashion to their ancestors hundreds of years ago. The most interesting of the islands include the amazing Uros islands, where people live on floating bundles of reeds, and Taquile and Amantaní, where traditional crafts still dominate the way of life.
There are also many interesting archaeological sites near the Lake, including Sillustani, where the finely worked funerary towers rise out of the altiplano, and the Temple of Fertility, with dozens of stone phalluses emerging from the ground. The highland towns, where colonial churches mix with ancient traditions, are a fascinating look into a part of Peru few people experience.

Lake Titicaca is the largest lake in South America, and the deepest point of the lake measures 284m. The lake is one of the main tourist destinations in Peru, and most travellers who come to this part of Peru take a trip on the lake and visit the islands. The beautiful dark blue waters, against the brown of the surrounding hills and the white of the Cordillera Real in Bolivia, are very beautiful. However, the lake offers more than just wonderful views, and the islands are the home to some of the most ancient traditions in Peru, with many different peoples living in the area. The area around Lake Titicaca is predominantly Aymara speaking, with the exception of the Amantaní and Taquile islands, where Quechua is spoken. However, the area to the west of the lake is Quechua, and the lake is the meeting point of these two cultures. The Uros culture also comes from this area, although it has largely died out, and the Uros Islands are now Aymara speaking.