The Latin America Travel Experts

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The Llama Travel Blog

Latin America captivates travellers for many reasons, one of which being its many natural wonders. Here we showcase the natural beauty to be found in every corner of the region. From the striking peaks of Torres del Paine in Chile, to the serene and photogenic Lake Attitlan in Guatemala, stunning natural features abound. Scroll down to see our top 10 Natural Wonders in Latin America, in no particular order. 

The joys of rural hospitality seems to be a theme which runs the length and breadth of the world. The further outside the cities you get, the friendlier the people become, and oftentimes, the more inviting the landscapes become too. Latin America is a friendly part of the world to begin with, and boasts a diverse set of landscapes capable of inspiring awe and setting one at ease simultaneously.

Apart from that though, spending some time outside the cities provides a glimpse into a different side of the place you’re visiting. Perhaps this is why hacienda (or estancia) stays in Latin America are becoming ever more popular. We now offer 3 separate opportunities for you to get a taste of hacienda life, ranging from an afternoon excursion to a 3 day/2 night visit. And here they are…

Last December, I was lucky enough to spend two weeks in the depths of wild Patagonia, the vast, almost-unpopulated area found in the very southern end of South America. This unique area is known for its varied landscapes, amazing birdlife, and the feeling of being completely cut off from reality. One could easily spend months exploring this part of Chile and Argentina, but here, in no particular order, I have outlined my top five, unmissable Patagonian experiences.

Tierra del Fuego, the archipelago at the end of the world, has been a beacon to explorers since the days of Magellan and Darwin. Lying off the southernmost tip of Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego encompasses a scattering of islands across the stormy South Atlantic and the Strait of Magellan. The islands of Tierra del Fuego, including the desolate Cape Horn and the Diego Ramírez Islands, are the forerunners to the frozen expanses of Antarctica, and exist in very harsh subpolar conditions. The largest island in the archipelago is Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, a rugged region of mountain ranges and steppe, fringed with glaciers and dramatic coastlines.