The Latin America Travel Experts

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Displaying items by tag: Ecuador holidays

If you are considering a visit to Latin America for the first time, you might not be fully aware of just what makes this region so wonderful. Numerous travel companies exist purely to show the world Latin America, so it must have something worth writing home about, right?

Indeed. It’s tricky to sum up an entire continent in a couple of points, particularly when that continent is as diverse as South America. However, there are certain threads which run the length and breadth of the region.

Ecuador is world famous for the Galapagos Islands – an archipelago which more-than-deserves its reputation. Not only is the wildlife there abundant and easy to spot, but Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution was formed here, and to this day the islands are an important destination for scientists.

However, while Galapagos is undoubtedly special, there is more to Ecuador than these offshore islands.

Here are some of the features of mainland Ecuador which make it worth visiting.

Latin America is a beauty - culturally and landscape-wise. Our photo bank is brimming with images of the continent and now seems as good a time as any to showcase some of these photos. These photos reveal just how gorgeous Latin America's landscapes really are. 

The Amazon Jungle. Whether you visit it from Peru, Ecuador or Brazil, you will find that it is lush, and dense, and filled with lots of different plants and animals – the reason you are presumably visiting. You will also find that it can be very damp, if not outright wet, and brimming with insects. Make the most of your Amazon visit by being prepared. 

“Food is a central activity of mankind and one of the single most significant trademarks of a culture.” - Mark Kurlansky

Hacienda Zuleta is a stunning and luxurious farmstay in the Ecuadorian paramo of the Imbabura province, outside Quito. It is a very special destination, as Catherine, our marketing executive discovered recently.

The joys of rural hospitality seems to be a theme which runs the length and breadth of the world. The further outside the cities you get, the friendlier the people become, and oftentimes, the more inviting the landscapes become too. Latin America is a friendly part of the world to begin with, and boasts a diverse set of landscapes capable of inspiring awe and setting one at ease simultaneously.

Apart from that though, spending some time outside the cities provides a glimpse into a different side of the place you’re visiting. Perhaps this is why hacienda (or estancia) stays in Latin America are becoming ever more popular. We now offer 3 separate opportunities for you to get a taste of hacienda life, ranging from an afternoon excursion to a 3 day/2 night visit. And here they are…

All You Need is Ecuador


  • 15 February 2016

Catherine! Un gusto conocerte! This was a phrase I heard over and over again in Ecuador, always with the emphasis on gusto – it was a genuine pleasure to meet me. Contrary to how this might be construed, it says more about the Ecuadorian people than it does about my likeability as a person (although I am charming).

I crossed the border into Ecuador at 5am on a dark, but already warm and sticky morning. Going through immigration was a shock to the system, ejected from the dark morning into the harsh fluorescent lighting, to stand in line for a passport stamp while babies cried and a group of teenagers on a school trip shouted excitedly over one another. It was not a particularly pleasant experience, but it was soon forgotten. Back on the bus, I could not bring myself to doze, overcome as I was by the sensation of being in a new country.

Llama Travel’s Travel Consultant Matt has travelled all over South America, from the dense jungles of the Peruvian Amazon rainforest to the colonial cities of Colombia, but for him, a certain volcanic archipelago in the Pacific Ocean will always be a particularly special place. Read on to see why Matt thinks that the Galapagos Islands are as extraordinary today as they were when Darwin first set foot on them almost 180 years ago.